Annex Dike Project

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Project Overview

In 2019, the City of Fernie commissioned and completed a Flood Mitigation Plan, which identified flood hazards based on existing flood protection infrastructure and new floodplain mapping from the 2017 Elk River and 2014 Coal Creek studies. Many of the existing dikes were determined to be too low, and additional gaps in flood protection were identified throughout the community. The recommended mitigation measures throughout the City were prioritized based on the associated risks using a likelihood and consequence of failure methodology.

Based on this plan, the City has secured $8.234 million in funding to improve flood protection since 2019.

The Annex Dike Project is the City's third major flood mitigation and protection initiative and is valued at $4.975 million.

The Annex Dike protects the over 900 residences, 113 commercial properties, 6 industrial properties, and 2,000+ citizens living in the Annex neighbourhood.

Further enhancements to the project are being funded through a $500,000 provincial Active Transportation grant that will provide paved trails, accessible and inclusive features, and integrate the Annex Park trails with the grant-funded phase 1 of the Fernie Valley Pathway for a combined project value of $7.178 million.

This project represents a significant investment in meeting the challenges of climate change and climate change mitigation by investing in both flood protection and active transportation, supporting reduced reliance on motorized transportation throughout the community.


Project Goals

This focus of this project is to:

  • Raise the dike along the 1,800 linear meters of the existing dike to identified flood construction levels
  • Reconstruct the dike slope and crest
  • Improve erosion protection
  • Provide accessible and inclusive features that benefit locals and visitors
  • Connect the Annex trail system to the Fernie Valley Pathway and provide improved inclusive accessibility and trail animation/interpretation


Project Status and Next Steps

The detailed designs for the Annex Dike Project are currently 90% approved.

Once designs are complete, the City of Fernie will issue a Request for Proposal that combines the final design and paving of the Fernie Valley Pathway and Annex Dike project to provide an integrated, inclusive, active transportation corridor connecting the community along the Elk River and Highway 3.


Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Can I purchase or lease land adjacent to the Annex Dike that I have encroached on?

A: In nearly every case, no.

This flood mitigation project is grant funded, and the grant funding may be partially in jeopardy if we start adjusting the dike to suit encroaching property owners.

Despite the impacts to individual properties that encroach, it is unfair to taxpayers to move a very expensive capital investment to avoid encroached areas.

Residents must relocate any structures, landscaping, or fencing within their property lines as originally requested.

The City will not sell land that provides access to dike flood responses and maintenance needs or adjust the dike design to accommodate encroachments.

Q: What happens to fences on my property lines?

Heavy equipment, maintenance crews, and inspectors always require full access to the dike despite this need being intermittent and sometimes not needed for many years. If fences encroach and impede this access, they must be either removed or moved back onto private property. The City will work with individual property owners to determine if it is possible to accommodate requests to keep such fences while ensuring the safety and protection of the public and property.

Q: What is the setback, and will vehicles be driven near my fence?

The setback is the space required by Provincial standards and the Inspector of Dikes for approvals, and for practical reasons such as minimizing costs of construction and ensuring access for inspections and maintenance in the future. This means property owners need to ensure the setback area defined for the Dike is clear and free of any items and that they are not encroaching into this area.

Property lines have been staked as part of this project and property owners should be fully aware of their property boundaries and keep private use within their private property.

Q: What will this look like when it’s done, and how long will construction last?

The City has reviewed 90% designs with the engineers designing the Dike. We will host individual meetings with impacted property owners, a dike walk for anyone interested, and publish online public information to share the final designs and discuss improvements and materials.

This project will deliver a Dike and trial system that improves on the technical function and flood protection, and the aesthetic and accessibility of the park and trail system. There will be public engagement regarding design elements and the special features along the trail system in the future as this project advances.

Project Overview

In 2019, the City of Fernie commissioned and completed a Flood Mitigation Plan, which identified flood hazards based on existing flood protection infrastructure and new floodplain mapping from the 2017 Elk River and 2014 Coal Creek studies. Many of the existing dikes were determined to be too low, and additional gaps in flood protection were identified throughout the community. The recommended mitigation measures throughout the City were prioritized based on the associated risks using a likelihood and consequence of failure methodology.

Based on this plan, the City has secured $8.234 million in funding to improve flood protection since 2019.

The Annex Dike Project is the City's third major flood mitigation and protection initiative and is valued at $4.975 million.

The Annex Dike protects the over 900 residences, 113 commercial properties, 6 industrial properties, and 2,000+ citizens living in the Annex neighbourhood.

Further enhancements to the project are being funded through a $500,000 provincial Active Transportation grant that will provide paved trails, accessible and inclusive features, and integrate the Annex Park trails with the grant-funded phase 1 of the Fernie Valley Pathway for a combined project value of $7.178 million.

This project represents a significant investment in meeting the challenges of climate change and climate change mitigation by investing in both flood protection and active transportation, supporting reduced reliance on motorized transportation throughout the community.


Project Goals

This focus of this project is to:

  • Raise the dike along the 1,800 linear meters of the existing dike to identified flood construction levels
  • Reconstruct the dike slope and crest
  • Improve erosion protection
  • Provide accessible and inclusive features that benefit locals and visitors
  • Connect the Annex trail system to the Fernie Valley Pathway and provide improved inclusive accessibility and trail animation/interpretation


Project Status and Next Steps

The detailed designs for the Annex Dike Project are currently 90% approved.

Once designs are complete, the City of Fernie will issue a Request for Proposal that combines the final design and paving of the Fernie Valley Pathway and Annex Dike project to provide an integrated, inclusive, active transportation corridor connecting the community along the Elk River and Highway 3.


Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Can I purchase or lease land adjacent to the Annex Dike that I have encroached on?

A: In nearly every case, no.

This flood mitigation project is grant funded, and the grant funding may be partially in jeopardy if we start adjusting the dike to suit encroaching property owners.

Despite the impacts to individual properties that encroach, it is unfair to taxpayers to move a very expensive capital investment to avoid encroached areas.

Residents must relocate any structures, landscaping, or fencing within their property lines as originally requested.

The City will not sell land that provides access to dike flood responses and maintenance needs or adjust the dike design to accommodate encroachments.

Q: What happens to fences on my property lines?

Heavy equipment, maintenance crews, and inspectors always require full access to the dike despite this need being intermittent and sometimes not needed for many years. If fences encroach and impede this access, they must be either removed or moved back onto private property. The City will work with individual property owners to determine if it is possible to accommodate requests to keep such fences while ensuring the safety and protection of the public and property.

Q: What is the setback, and will vehicles be driven near my fence?

The setback is the space required by Provincial standards and the Inspector of Dikes for approvals, and for practical reasons such as minimizing costs of construction and ensuring access for inspections and maintenance in the future. This means property owners need to ensure the setback area defined for the Dike is clear and free of any items and that they are not encroaching into this area.

Property lines have been staked as part of this project and property owners should be fully aware of their property boundaries and keep private use within their private property.

Q: What will this look like when it’s done, and how long will construction last?

The City has reviewed 90% designs with the engineers designing the Dike. We will host individual meetings with impacted property owners, a dike walk for anyone interested, and publish online public information to share the final designs and discuss improvements and materials.

This project will deliver a Dike and trial system that improves on the technical function and flood protection, and the aesthetic and accessibility of the park and trail system. There will be public engagement regarding design elements and the special features along the trail system in the future as this project advances.

Page last updated: 20 October 2021, 16:00